Wild Things

Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak, who died at 83 this past May. For the NY Times obituary, where this image was taken from, see footnote at bottom

 When you think of the Wild Things of Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are you might as well think of Gorgons. As any American who grew up since it was published in 1963 will remember Max was sent to bed without his supper because he roared his terrible roar and gnashed his terrible teeth and screamed his terrible scream too wildly. A forest grows in his room and he’s transported by sea to where the Wild Things live, but Max cows them easily, and becomes the King of All Wild Things by staring them down, unblinking as he holds their yellow eyes steady. Perhaps because Sendak had a soft side, or perhaps because children’s book publishers wouldn’t have permitted it, but Max doesn’t behead The Wild Things as Perseus did their predecessor, nor does he make the Wild Things as terrifying as Gorgons. He couldn’t have.

The very word Gorgon means Dreadful or Terrible in Greek.  They were popular in Greek mythology – if you looked them in the eye you’d turn to stone. Perseus famously outsmarted the most famous of the Gorgons, Medusa, by looking at her in the reflection of his shield, and then beheading her serpent-haired head. Sadly for her, Medusa was not immortal as her two Gorgon sisters Stheno and Euryale were.  They were said to be the daughters of the sea God Phorcys and his sister-wife Ceto (a sea monster).

Red-figured cup by Douris, 480-470 BC, Cerveteri, Etruria now in the Vatican Museum. The python is regurgitating Jason (gross, eh?!?), the Golden Fleece hangs from a branch while Athena looks on with he aegis bearing the Gorgon and helmut with winged lioness, www.wikipedia.com
Red-figured cup by Douris, 480-470 BC, Cerveteri, Etruria now in the Vatican Museum. The python is regurgitating Jason (gross, eh?!?), the Golden Fleece hangs from a branch while Athena looks on with he aegis bearing the Gorgon and helmut with winged lioness, www.wikipedia.com

Often they were depicted as having fangs and skin of a serpent, and hair made of poisonous snakes.  Sometimes they had wings of gold, brazen claws, tusks of a boar.  Lionesses and sphinxes are often associated with them, and generally they were used in architecture to protect the building – for instance temples protecting the oldest of oracles (the oldest stone pediment in Greece, dated from 600 BC, is from the Temple of Artemis at Corfu and what is in the primary location, smack dab in the middle of the pediment? A Dreadful Gorgon of course).

Disk Fibula Gorgoneion Bronze with repoussé decoration, Boeotian production under Corinthian influence, second half of the 6th century BC. From Asia Minor, Louvre www.wikipedia.com

Disk Fibula Gorgoneion Bronze with repoussé decoration, Boeotian production under Corinthian influence, second half of the 6th century BC. From Asia Minor, at the Louvre www.wikipedia.com

So why do I linger on Gorgons? Perhaps because, apart from protecting temples and installed pretectively in architecture, Gorgons frequently appear in Greek pottery….  Greek Pots could very well figure in a good Food and Wine THATLou, which just happens to be coming up**. Likewise Gorgons would be prime suspects for a Bestiary THATLou, which remains unscheduled as such but is bound to pop up sooner or later. For instance this Gorgon Pot found in the Sully wing would be a great cross-purpose pot for both the Food+Wine THATLou as well as a Bestiary hunt, no?

Gorgon Painter Dinos, taken from Google Images

Gorgon Painter Dinos, taken from Google Images

What makes it so special is that it is one of the first pots to have a continuous narration (where one piece of art depicts the story at different stages) of Perseus’s story, where he’s running from Medusa’s Gorgon sisters (as seen below). The pot scene is so famous that history named the painter the Gorgon Painter, though he of course did many other pots in the 6th century BC.

Gorgon Painter Dinos, 580 BC, taken from Wikipedia

Gorgon Painter Dinos, 580 BC, taken from Wikipedia

More on all these topics – Gorgons, Food+ Wine THATLou, Bestiary, Greek Pots – soon. For now I’ll leave you with a hyperlink to Maurice Sendak’s obituary in the NY Times from this past May.

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The Food + Wine THATLou is at 7 PM on Wednesday 8 August and will be co-hosted with Alisa Morov, of Sweet Pea Paris, Jennifer Greco of Chez Loulou and Jenny Beaumont. More on this Foodies in France bonanza soon, of course!

10 thoughts on “Wild Things

  1. Edna

    Once again, I am SO bummed to be missing the Food + Wine THATLou!

    Also, that last photo doesn’t really seem too dreadful. Looks more like a Bacchus-figure than a Gorgon to me!

    Reply
    1. Daisy de Plume

      Yes, it’s true, he’s got that funny smile and those huge cheeks. Am very disappointed I won’t see you at the Foodies in France THATLou, too, but am SUPER impressed that you’re covering the Olympics! Congrats, Missy!

      Reply
  2. Marissa

    Love this post!
    I don’t know if it’s coming to France, but an indie film called Beasts of the Southern Wild has just come out, and I’d highly recommend it. It’s the story of 6 yr. old Hushpuppy, who lives beyond the levee in the American south, and it reminded me a lot of Where the Wild Things Are + The Odyssey–a perfect match for gorgons in the Louvre.

    Reply
    1. Daisy de Plume

      Marissa! How funny. Thanks for the heads up, I shall certainly keep my eyes out for Beasts of the Southern Wild. And I completely agree – what more could one want than a match between Where the Wild Things Are and the Odyssey!. Loved reading your posts on Languedoc.

      Reply
  3. parisbreakfast

    I wish I could be here too for your Foodie in France…
    The Douris cup design is so elegant and refined the naughty python doesn’t bother me a bit.
    Only Sendak could make gorgons sweet and friendly…

    Reply
    1. Daisy de Plume

      I completely agree, Carol. Sendak made everything sweet. I used to run into him at Lanciannis when I was in HS sneaking a cigarette over a coffee and homework with friends.
      You’ll be there in spirit!

      Reply
  4. Pingback: The Cross-Purpose Greek Pot | THATLou

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  6. Pingback: The Cross-Purpose Greek Pot | THATLou

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